Exciting Things Are Afoot!!

Last week I had some fantastic news that one of my liquid silver emulsion pictures “Dwarfie Stane, Hoy” had been accepted to be part of the ACTINIC Festival show in Edinburgh this summer!!

GrahamVasey_DwarfieStane,Hoy

Dwarfie Stane, Hoy. 100x75cm liquid emulsion on water colour paper.

I originally took the picture back in August 2013 when Helen, Alice and me travelled to the far north for a holiday on the isles of Orkney, and when I heard about this competition out of the four photographs I submitted it was this one I hoped they would pick! The exhibition will take place in July and has been organised by a fantastic group called Alt-Photo Scotland who dedicated to connecting and promoting alternative photography in Scotland and beyond so it really is a great honor to be chosen to display my work amongst some of the best in the world! More information about dates etc to follow!!

http://www.alternativephotographyscotland.org/

Oh and if your interested here is the original blog post!

https://grahamvasey.wordpress.com/2013/09/16/fifty-nine-degrees-north/

Cheers

Graham

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Whitby In Spring Time.

I discovered a fantastic old northeast term the other day in a book I’m currently reading called Landmarks written by Robert Macfarlane, and that is “Lambin’ Storm” the name given to the gales which batter our coastline in Mid March, and not to be proven wrong that’s just what mother nature gave Helen and me on our visit to Whitby the other week. A blustery cold north easterly wind had whipped the high spring tides into a furious white foam and waves rolled in and crashed against the stone walls of the harbour. Now some people may think we were mad to venture to the seaside in such conditions, but for me I don’t think you could ask for a better day to walk along the pier as the sea crashes against it while the wind pulls at your hair and your clothes, plus it makes sneaking into a cosy pub afterwards even more rewarding.

Whitby Pier Lith

Lambin’ Storm, Whitby. Carl Zeiss Super Ikonta 6×9.

The day out also gave me chance to put a film through a vintage Carl Zeiss Super Ikonta folding camera which because of  some corrosion on the film gate and a little fungus in the lens had been put to one side. A little bit of black model paint sorted out the rust problem but all I could do for the lens was give it a good polish. Thankfully the fungus seems only to be in the front element and I couldn’t see any evidence that effecting the quality of the lens.

Whitby Pots

Pots, Whitby Harbour. Carl Zeiss Super Ikonta 6×9.

For these photographs I wanted to do something different. I’ve been saving some of my favourite black and white paper, Forte Museum Weight, which was made by a once great Hungarian photographic company called Forte, sadly they closed down a few years ago so the paper is no longer in production, so these last few boxes are probably the last I’ll ever have. One of the great attributes of this paper is it’s perfect for developing with Lith which are specialist developers used in a highly diluted solution and create a warm grainy print with a unique tonal range. The paper is usually over-exposed by 2 or 3 stops, then when the required density of image is achieved it is ‘snatched’ from the developer and placed into a stop bath. Lith printing can produce a very wide range of different colour and tone effects, and the contrast can be adjusted by varying the exposure time and development time. The image colour varies a great deal from warm – brown, olive, yellow, pink through to ivory, giving each print it’s individuality. The Lith developer I used for these photographs was Fotospeed LD20 which is  readily available and easy to use, but there are a number of others on the market. I really like this method and definitely feel it captured the atmosphere of the gritty, windswept day we spent in beautiful, unique Whitby.

 

 

 

Lost and Found?

It’s strange sometimes what you pick up and put in your pocket when your out in the hills, almost a year ago while  walking near Cross Fell with my friend Paul Denham I came across this camera, and incredible as it may sound this is what the film contained…..

 

Nahhh…. not really, I’ve just been playing with my Lomokino again filming Paul and me wandering about in the moors!! One day I’ll get round to creating a really short film in the mean time I hoped you liked this clip!

 

Cheers

 

Graham

A trip to Inkerman

Inkerman isn’t the kind of name you would normally associate with the small town of Tow Law high up above Weardale in County Durham, but the connections are there. In 1854 the Durham Light Infantry, known then as 68th Regiment of Foot nicknamed The Faithful Durhams, fought in one of the most important battles of the Crimean War. It took place on a freezing cold foggy day in November, and it was said that the Durhams where the only regiment to have fought in their red jackets, since they alone took off their greatcoats during this winter battle. Since that day the anniversary of 5th of November was celebrated by the regiment as Inkerman Day, so it makes sense to find the name of this distant battle here on the edge of the Durham coal fields.  

It wasn’t until Charles Atwood built his Iron works in 1840’s that Tow Law started to grow from  a tiny farmstead to town with a population of 5000 people. Six blast furnaces were built and they were fuelled by coal from the nearby collieries, such as Black Prince, Royal George and West Edward. The coal was not burned in its raw farm. Instead it was first turned into coke, by baking it in an oven to drive off the impurities. At the beginning of the industrial revolution this was done in beehive shaped brick ovens. Thousands of these were built across County Durham but very few of them survive today, and some of the last few stand beside the Inkerman Road.  

The morning I chose to visit the remains of the Inkerman Coke Ovens was cold and foggy which felt like the right kind of weather to visit this place. Now standing beside a coal yard, these strange conical structures look more like something that belongs to a Scottish Broch or ancient burial tomb than heavy industry. But as you peer inside one of collapsed ovens it’s clear to see the charred bricks, fused together by the extreme heat used during the oven’s firing. Maybe the coke made in these ovens produced the iron and steel rifles and bayonets used by the 68th on that day? The 1840’s also saw the birth of photography with Fox Tolbot announcing his discovery of the Calotype process, and it was during the Crimean War the new art form was used to document the conflict. So it seemed fitting to use some of Tolbot’s techniques to create my prints.

Inkerman Oven

Inkerman Oven.

90mm Schneider Angulon lens, F8. Fomapan 100 developed in Prescysol. Salt Print.

Inside Coke Oven

Charred Bricks.

90mm Schneider Angulon lens, F8. Fomapan 100 developed in Prescysol. Salt Print.

I used Randall Webb’s formula to create my salt prints taken from his book Spirit of Salt, if you see a copy get it, it’s a superb book!! As I was leaving the site I noticed an inscription carved into a wooden post

“For many hearts with cool ore chorred and few remember”

W. Owen

The words of the war poet Wilfred Owen seemed appropriate for this place.

Thanks

Graham

A Camera Reborn….well almost

Well in my last post I said I was getting ready for a trip to Ilkley Moor, but it turned out I had once again lost complete track of time and I was a week a head of myself! So with a free day to play with I decided to nip up to the dales and test out a new camera.

A few months ago Richard a good friend of mine, asked me if I wanted to borrow a vintage folding camera which could take 6x11cm negatives.  It turned out to be  a lovely old 1930’s Voigtlander Inos II but the only problem was it was designed to take 116 film which is no longer made. Luckily though Richard has converted a number of similar cameras to take 120 film and assured me it was a pretty straight forward bit of DIY.  So with lots of helpful advice from Rich and a bit of internet research here’s what I did…

Camera Mod 020

My first problem was figuring out the best way to adapt the camera so it would take the smaller 120 film which is used in all modern medium format cameras and is readily available. The easiest way is to make some inserts which fill in the gaps between the camera sprockets and the spool of film so it’s held in place inside the camera. This is great because it means you don’t have to permenantly alter the camera.

2 spools

Inside the camera on one side there are two spring loaded pins which hold the role of unexposed film, on the other side there is a pin on the bottom and spade ended sprocket on the top, this is meant to fit into a slot in the end of the  film spool so you can advance film after every exposure. As you can see the width of the original 116 film spool (the bottom one) is not that much wider than the new 120, so I didn’t have much room to work with. After a little look online I found the easiest method is to take some plastic rawl plugs, cut them to size and push them into the ends of the spool.

Inserts1

This worked great but to make inserts for the wind on sprockets was a little more tricky. I tried a few different ways but none of them really seemed to work for me, so in the end I just did the same thing with the rawl plugs but this time I cut a slot in the rawl plug for the spade ended sprocket to fit into.

Inserts2

 

I then taped some thin strips of black card along the top and bottom of the film gate (the opening inside the camera where the film is exposed) to hold the narrower 120 film in place and stop it from curling up while I’m trying to take a picture.

film mask

 

Once that was done I found an old film I could use as a test role, a couple of runs through and everything seemed to be working ok. This camera like most folding cameras doesn’t have a film counter, instead you look through a small red glass inspection window in the back of the camera to read  the frame numbers which are printed onto the backing paper. But since I was now using a different film the numbers printed on the back of the film no longer matched the camera so the test role helped me get a rough idea how much film to wind on for each frame.  All I needed to do now was to put a new role of film through it, take some pictures and see what turned out!!

The weather was pretty decent  and I had a couple of ideas for some locations in Teesdale were I could try out the camera.

Camera test

Everything seemed to be working fine but when I got home and processed the film I found things hadn’t gone as well as I’d hoped.

 

 

Beach Trees

 

 

First I got a lot of fog. I checked the camera bellows with a torch (something I really should’ve done before hand) and I found a number of small holes where the material had frayed at the edge, that was a bit of a disappointment, but I didn’t think that was the only cause of the light leak. Being made over 80 years ago the film this camera was designed to take was much slower than the film we use today, it was also quite often Orthochromatic and not red light sensitive. The pictures I took in the woods out of direct sunlight had a lot less fog and the results were pretty good so I think the red film window on the back of the camera may have been allowing too much light in for the faster modern film. The only other little issue was that one side of the neg was uneven, but I have no idea why, it may be something to do with the film lifting at one side. Having said all that the negatives are still almost 6x10cm!!

tractor tyre

Well back to the drawing board! I did a bit of repair work to the bellows and double checked with the torch to make sure I’d sealed the holes, I then simply covered over the film window with some electrical tape. While I was tinkering I had a second look at the inserts for the film advancing spool and decided to make something a bit more substantial.

Film spool mod1

 

I took a couple of spare spools and cut the ends off and sanded them down to the correct size so that when I super glued them to either end of another spool the final width would be exactly the same as the original 116 one. You can also see in this picture my failed attempt to narrow the original 116 film spool using foam so it would take 120, but I was much happier with my final attempt and fingers crossed it should be a lot more stable.

Film spool mod2

 

 

So all there’s left to do now is give it another go!!

Cheers

Graham

 

 

 

 

Merry Christmas!!

Copely Chimney Xmas Card

Hello I would just like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas and a happy new year, and to thank you all for following my blog and for all the great comments you have made, it’s really made it all worth while. I’ve already got loads of places in mind to visit and ideas for new posts in the new year, can’t wait!!

Cheers

Graham

Behind the scenes.

Recently I’ve been asked for more details about how I create my photographs in the darkroom, and struck me that lately my blog has mostly been concentrating on my trips out and about taking pictures. But this is only really a small portion of the work that goes into making my final prints for sale in the gallery. In fact when I first started this blog this was one of the elements I really wanted to include, so in the future I’m going to try to show a little more behind the scenes, and try to explain some of the techniques and processes I use.

Photo for Gallerina 009

Setting up my 6×6 enlarger for a print destined for the gallery.

I am really lucky to be represented by Gallerina, a contemporary fine art gallery in Darlington so to get the ball rolling I thought I would post the trailer from the fantastic documentary they filmed about my work called Infinity!!

 

What I really love about this film is it gives a great snap shot of all the different steps I make to get to the completed photograph. Ok this bit may sound a bit of  a blatant plug but if  you are interested in seeing the full length film they may still have some copies of the DVD left at the gallery, please get in touch at www.gallerina.com

Cheers

Graham