Land Of Lead

 

These days I usually head out to the hills by myself and I don’t often get chance to go walking with my friends. So when I got a call from one of my best and oldest friends asking me if I wanted to head out for a walk I wasn’t going to miss out on the opportunity! We made plans to meet after the new year. By then more snow had arrived and as we drove through Richmond and started to head up Swaledale the landscape quickly became a winter wonderland of snow and ice.

We where heading for Surrender Bridge which sits high in the fells above the small town of Reeth. From there we wanted to explore the ruins of the Old Gang Smelt Mill one of the best preserved relics of lead mining industry that’s once dominated this landscape.

It’s a steep drive up to Surrender Bridge and the higher we climbed the worse the roads became. I couldn’t help feeling grateful that I had just replaced my front tyres, and for once I had someone with me who could get out and push. Very soon the road had completely vanished beneath the snow, but luckily it stated to level out a bit so we decided it would be safer to park up and travel the rest of the way on foot.

It seemed like an age since me and Gareth had last been out walking together, and it didn’t take long for us to fall back into our usual banter of music, films, and on this particular trip the Viking Saga’s! Crossing the mysteriously named Surrender Bridge, talk turned to the possible origins of it’s name, which as far I’m as I am aware know one alive today knows? On the OS map higher up the fell they have marked a Surrender Ground and a Surrender Moss which I think all took their names from the local Surrender Mine, but where that name comes from who knows?  We followed the Old Gang Beck up its little dale and quickly we started stopping to take pictures. The landscape was breath taking, the thin dusting of snow gave a dramatic contrast to the dark heather and the dry stone walls, while all the time clouds constantly rolled over the fells.

North Gate To Brownsey Moor

North Gate to Browney Moor, 90mm Schneider Angulon and Fomapan 200.

Soon we reached the dramatic ruins of the Old Gang Smelt Mill. I often come across the remains of lead mining on my walks and I still find it hard to believe that these places where once the centres of a major heavy industry which boomed throughout the 18th and 19th century, at it’s hight employing 1,260 people in Swaledale alone. The days freezing weather brought into sharp foucus what the men, woman and quite often children had to endure to earn their daily wage. But by the 20th century cheap importants forced all the mines to close, and in the end the Old Gang Lead Mining Company which was once one of the largest employers in the dale was sold for £25 in 1933. We climbed above the old smelt mill to explore the ruins of the massive peat store. The huge structure was said to hold up 3 years supply of dried peat to feed the fires of the mills in the valley below. The game keepers had been hard at work burning back the heather for the red grouse, and the charred remains seemed to suit the subject matter somehow.

Peat House

Peat Store, 90mm Schneider Angulon and Fomapan 200

Soon the weather started to close in around us as heavy snow laiden clouds started to move across the hills, so we decided to leave the higher summit for another day and beat a retreat back to the car before it became buried in fresh snow.

Throughout the day we talked a lot about the Norse settlers who came to these dales in the 10th century and left there mark in many of the place names and dialect of their descendants. Many of which I’ve used in this post such as dale, fell, beck many of which can be seen in the place names of Norway and Iceland. But a poem kept returning to me which I first read as student which though not really Nordic seemed apt for days weather….

“Where has gone the steed? Where has gone the man? Where has gone the giver of treasure? Where has gone the place of banquets? Where has gone the pleasure of the hall? Alas, the gleaming chalice; alas, the armoured warrior; alas, the majesty of the prince! Truly, that time has passed away, grown dark under the helm of night as though it had never been. Now there remains among the traces of those dear people a wall, remarkably high, painted with serpentine patterns. The might of ash spears has snatched away the men, the weapon greedy for carnage, notorious fate; and storms beat upon those heaps of stones. A falling snow storms fetters the earth, winter’s howling. The darkness comes; the shadow of night spreads gloom and send from the north fierce hailstorms to the terror of men. The whole kingdom of earth is full of hardship. Here wealth is ephemeral; here a friend is ephemeral; here man is ephemeral; here kinsman is ephemeral; all this this foundation of earth will become desolate.”

Wanderer [Book Of Exeter]

See the Anglo-Saxons could write a pretty good tale as well Gaz!!

If you want to see more photographs from our trip to the fells please have look of my friends blog post:

https://numberofthegaz.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/old-gang-smelt-mill-swaledale-north-yorkshire/

Thanks once again for reading!

Graham

 

 

All Alone On Cotherstone Moor

Well like for many my December was frantic! Every year it doesn’t matter how much I try to plan a head it always ends up mad dash to get everything sorted. But it’s always well worth it particularly this year with three separate print commissions and one off the wall sale all from Gallerina. All this work certainly kept me on my toes, so when Christmas eve finally arrived it was lovely to sit back and relax with the family and enjoy the festive holiday. But in all this madness I did end up with one free day, and lucky for me it coincided with the first snow fall of the year.

It was a Saturday and we had originally planned to pick our family Christmas tree, but plans soon changed when we found out Little’n was being taken to the Panto by her Nana. So with the day now free I decided to revisit a spot I first found back in the Autumn.  On that day gale force winds had meant it was pretty much impossible for me to capture the photograph I wanted, so it has been on the top of my list of places I had to go back to ever since.

The drive up there was definitely interesting and I had to take care in negotiating the numerous patches of snow and ice along the small road that runs across the moors between Bowes and Cotherstone. As I reached the highest point of the journey the days objective came into view the small rocky summit of Crag Hill.  From the road side it was a short walk to its top where in amongst the rough gritstone slabs and boulders which give this hill it’s name stands probably one of the most incredibly weather-beaten trees in Teesdale. It’s incredible to think that for decades this tree has stood what ever the elements has thrown at it leaving it twisted and scared, but for all that it  still stands on it’s wind swept craggy hill side.

Crag Hill

Lifting Cloud Over Crag Hill. Schneider 90mm Angulon f6,8. Fomapan 200.

During this trip I also got chance to try out my new Grafmatic film back. It holds standard 5×4 sheet film but instead of like the conventional double darkslide which only holds two sheets this carries six. The film is held in thin metal septums which are mechanical pushed to the front each time you want to make an exposure and then rotated to the back once exposed.  It’s really neat plus it is a lot more compact that carrying normal film holders, and on this trip it performed really well.

So that was my first post for 2015 thanks for reading!!

Graham

Seasons Greetings!!

Snow flurry Xmas Letter

This photograph was taken on a cold winters day in the Howgill Fells below Wild Boar Fell. A sudden snow storm enveloped me and I was just able to capture this shot before everything disappeared in a blur of white. It’s not the greatest picture but it does make one look forward to a warm fire side and a hot cup of tea…or a nice dram of Islay Whisky??

Thanks to everyone who has been following my blog and liked my posts. It’s been a great year and I have thoroughly enjoyed creating this blog and the responses I received have been fantastic and I can’t wait till next year to find some new places to photograph!!

Happy Christmas everyone and I hope you all have a happy new year!!!

Balderhead and Shacklesborough

In my last post I had written how the weather had me trying to find shelter beside the River Greta from a howling north westerly wind, but as it often does in these northern parts it soon started to change. With improving conditions I was able to go back to my plan A and start exploring the high moorlands surrounding the lonely top of Shacklesborough at the head of Balderdale. I’ve been to the summit of this gritstone outcrop a couple of times in the past but I wanted to try and photograph it within the greater landscape and try to capture it’s sense of isolation. With my camera bag packed and my boots on I set off along the footpath to Crawlaw Stone Rigg, well I say path there wasn’t much evidence of any path on the ground just miles of rustling moorland grass…  so even better!!  As soon as I made the ridge of high ground above Hunder Beck the pork pie like summit of Shacklesborough appeared on the horizon, and as I climbed higher, far off in the distance Lunehead and the brooding shape of Mickle Fell could be seen. The whole scene filled me with a humbling sense of space, no wonder the Northern Pennines are home to some of England’s last true wild places.

Shaklesbrough

Shacklesborough, Shen-Hao 5×4, 90mm Schneider Angulon with Fompan 200.

From this direction it’s easy to see where maybe (well at least part of) the name Shacklesborough may have come from. The word borough comes from the Anglo-Saxon burg or the Norse Berg meaning fort, and from where I stood it certainly looked like some ancient fortification, with it’s steep craggy sides perched on top of a high spit of land, but where could the word shackles come from I’m not so sure. The noun comes from the old English to fetter or restrain, sober terms indeed to name a distant hill, it could also come from the other old English word scacol meaning tongue of land, Fort on the ridge perhaps?? In many of the Anglo-Saxon poems the ruins left by the Romans and early Britons where often accredited to “the work of gaints” as an eplanation of something which has passed out of memory. Maybe when the people started to settle in these upland areas they saw this place and thought it to be some ancient ring work built by a people long since vanished?

After all these Tolkienesque thoughts of fortresses and long lost kingdoms I decided to move on. By this time the sun had begun to climb higher and had started to burn off the morning clouds. Now for most people this would be the highlight of a nice day in the hills however for a black and white photographer searching for the dark isolation of the fells, sunny blue skies don’t really do it for me, so as I came to the deep gully of Crawlaw Gill I had just enough time to take one more shot before all the cloud had completely gone.

Shadow over Hunder Gill

Shadow Over Crawlaw Gill, Shen-Hao 5×4, 6.5inch Rank and Pullin lens, Fomapan 200.

After this I started to make my way back to where I left my car, it had been a productive day but I still feel like there’s more to explore so as soon as some more favourable weather returns I’ll definitely be back!

Here are a few notes on the photography in this post. The film I used for this trip was Fomapan 200 which I wanted to develope in traditional staining developer called PMK Pyro. It’s a great developer and I used to use it lot in my work because I like the contrast of the negatives it gives me which I feel print very well with my condenser enlarger. Sadly a while ago my usual supplier stopped selling it and I’ve struggled to find a new source, but after a bit of search online the other day I discovered you can now buy a dry kit made by Photographers Formulary from the Imaging Wharehouse which is great news.  The usual development time for the film is 12min at 20c but you need to agitate every 15sec which is great for conventional spiral developing tanks, but I find this a bit of a pain with the Combi-plan tank I use for my 5×4 sheet film, so I doubled the development time to 24min and which meant I only needed to agitate every 30secs which is a lot more managable, dead simple! Other than that everything else was pretty straight forward with all the prints being printed on Foma Chamois paper.

Thanks for reading!

Graham

 

 

Brave New World

Well I’m all for adventure and searching out the new, but sometimes it’s good to go with what you know, and not to overlook what is really just on your own doorstep. I must admit though most people aren’t so fortunate as to live on the edge of Teesdale, an area of outstanding natural beauty and England’s last wilderness so I guess I’m a bit spoilt when it comes to places to go out and take photographs. Same goes for my photography equipment, at times it’s better to go with the devil you know and stick to proven materials, that way if you’re out in the hills and lucky enough to stumble upon the perfect vista you can have some confidence that you may have a decent image at the end of it. Having said that, sometimes you just can’t help yourself and a new black and white film (a very rare thing these days in the digital age) comes on the market you just had to give it a try. So with a with a day of stormy weather forcasted a 20 minute drive to the other side of the dale and I was parking up on the slopes below the rocky gritstone outcrop of Goldsborough, with a couple of darkslides loaded with the new Adox  CHS 100 II film.

 

Goldbrough

Hanging Crag, Goldsborough, 90mm Schneider Angulon, Adox CHS 100 II.

The views from the top of the crag were stunning and made even more dramatic by encroaching heavy showers and storm clouds. I managed a few exposures until the wind started to pick up bringing with it a sweeping curtain of rain. Back home with a good brew in hand I started developing the films, and just incase anyone is interested here is what I did… I decided to use Tanol, a fine grain staining developer made by Moersch Photochemie. Because this is a new film I got in touch with Wolfgang Moersch and he recommended I develop the film for 10 mins at  20 degrees agitating constantly first full minute and then 4 times every 30 secs thereafter, this was all after a 3 min pre-soak in water.  For a stop bath I simply used plain water and then fixed with a non aggressive alkali fixer. The results were great, sharp smooth grain with a good balance between highlights and shadows, I couldn’t ask for better!! Well that’s about it, a bit of a dry and techy post but I hope someone may find it some help.

Cheers

Graham

 

 

In the Forests of Dunnerdale

Back at the beginning of March with the sense of spring in the air and warm days to come me and my friends Dave Branigan and Tom Sheard hatch a plan to meet in the Lake District for a walking and camping expedition. We picked a date and because none of us had ever been there before we chose Dunnerdale (also known as the Duddon Valley) as our destination,  but as it always happens at this time of year mother nature had different ideas and very quickly the weather began to return to winter. Not to be dismayed we carried on planning while constantly keeping an eye on the ever changing weather reports.

Basically the plan was for Dave and Tom to head up on the Friday afternoon and set up camp, I would then meet them there the next day. By Thursday it looked like the weather was on the turn for the better, and according to the mountain forecasts the high winds and poor visibility was going to clear by the afternoon and Saturday was going to be breezy but clear. So first thing on Saturday morning with my car loaded with cameras and walking gear (in fact a lot more cameras than walking gear) I set off to the Lakes.  When I arrived once again mother nature hadn’t been listening to our plans or the weather reports. Throughout the night Dave and Tom had been hammered by high winds. So much so that the only thing that had stopped the tent from being blown away was them tying it to the roof rack of Toms car,  if they had any phone signal it sounded like I would have got a message telling me not to bother!! But with a little drop in the wind, a brightening sky and a new more sheltered location found to set the tent their enthusiasm started to return.

Dunnerdale lies in the Southwest of the Lakes District and begins west of the Three Shires stone on Wrynose pass where the river Duddon heads south from Pike O’Blisco. In the west are Harter fell and the Ulpha fells; eastward are Dow crag and Coniston Old Man but without  tourist hotspots like Ambleside or Keswick or the famous peaks like ScarFell and Helvellyn draw the crowds it remains quiet and isolated, which in my mind just adds to its appeal. With the guys lack of sleep from the previous nights storms and the chance of more gale force gusts we decided to put off the high summits for another day and explore the tangle of woods and crags of the lower slopes.  Travelling light with only my Rolleicord, a few roles of film and my tripod we set off!

 

 

Beach Trees

Beach Trees. Hp5+ developed in Prescysol and printed on Foma Chamois.

 

Creeping Oak

Creeping Oak. Hp5+ developed in Prescysol and printed on Foma Chamois.

 

Clearing

Clearing. Hp5+ developed in Prescysol and printed on Foma Chamois.

 

Woden Tree

Woden Tree.  Hp5+ developed in Prescysol and printed on Foma Chamois.

 

Farmstead

Farmstead.  Hp5+ developed in Prescysol and printed on Foma Chamois.

It’s was a great walk and without being distracted by distant views I felt I was able to really delve into the atmosphere of  ancient woodland. We finished the day with a few pints of Corby Ale at the Newfield Inn in Seathwaite and then head back to the campsite for dinner. Now this is where Tom and Dave excel, these guys don’t mess around with gas stoves and Trangias, instead out came two fire pits and two cast iron dutch ovens, that night we dined on grouse roasted in hay and smoked breast of duck with new potatoes, now that’s cooking alfresco!!!

The han over and the washing up the next morning was not so pleasant though….

Cheers

 

Graham

 

A trip to Inkerman

Inkerman isn’t the kind of name you would normally associate with the small town of Tow Law high up above Weardale in County Durham, but the connections are there. In 1854 the Durham Light Infantry, known then as 68th Regiment of Foot nicknamed The Faithful Durhams, fought in one of the most important battles of the Crimean War. It took place on a freezing cold foggy day in November, and it was said that the Durhams where the only regiment to have fought in their red jackets, since they alone took off their greatcoats during this winter battle. Since that day the anniversary of 5th of November was celebrated by the regiment as Inkerman Day, so it makes sense to find the name of this distant battle here on the edge of the Durham coal fields.  

It wasn’t until Charles Atwood built his Iron works in 1840’s that Tow Law started to grow from  a tiny farmstead to town with a population of 5000 people. Six blast furnaces were built and they were fuelled by coal from the nearby collieries, such as Black Prince, Royal George and West Edward. The coal was not burned in its raw farm. Instead it was first turned into coke, by baking it in an oven to drive off the impurities. At the beginning of the industrial revolution this was done in beehive shaped brick ovens. Thousands of these were built across County Durham but very few of them survive today, and some of the last few stand beside the Inkerman Road.  

The morning I chose to visit the remains of the Inkerman Coke Ovens was cold and foggy which felt like the right kind of weather to visit this place. Now standing beside a coal yard, these strange conical structures look more like something that belongs to a Scottish Broch or ancient burial tomb than heavy industry. But as you peer inside one of collapsed ovens it’s clear to see the charred bricks, fused together by the extreme heat used during the oven’s firing. Maybe the coke made in these ovens produced the iron and steel rifles and bayonets used by the 68th on that day? The 1840’s also saw the birth of photography with Fox Tolbot announcing his discovery of the Calotype process, and it was during the Crimean War the new art form was used to document the conflict. So it seemed fitting to use some of Tolbot’s techniques to create my prints.

Inkerman Oven

Inkerman Oven.

90mm Schneider Angulon lens, F8. Fomapan 100 developed in Prescysol. Salt Print.

Inside Coke Oven

Charred Bricks.

90mm Schneider Angulon lens, F8. Fomapan 100 developed in Prescysol. Salt Print.

I used Randall Webb’s formula to create my salt prints taken from his book Spirit of Salt, if you see a copy get it, it’s a superb book!! As I was leaving the site I noticed an inscription carved into a wooden post

“For many hearts with cool ore chorred and few remember”

W. Owen

The words of the war poet Wilfred Owen seemed appropriate for this place.

Thanks

Graham

Twins Across the Moor..

A few weeks ago I was given a job to do……I had to travel deep into the Pennines to find some relics of the area’s lead mining history that once covered this regoin and take a picture…I know it’s hard a life, but a lovely couple visited the gallery and having viewed my work asked me to photograph two ancient, lonely chimneys that stand on top of a moor near Blanchland, and capture the bleakness of the surrounding landscape. The client showed me the location on his Ordinance Survey map, but other than that I was given free rein to explore and photograph as I wished, so as you may guess I was really excited to get this project started!!

So with my good friend Joe Kelley (the very talented poet who wrote the fantastic poems for my book Fell) we set off to the moors which sit high above Rookhope in the south and Blanchland in the north, on the borders of County Durham and Northumberland. As we drove across the summit of Dead Friar’s Stones on the road to the remote village  of Hunstanworth, the vast moorland plateau of Allenshields and Buckshott Moor could be seen with the two chimneys standing beneath the summit of Bolt’s Law. So we parked up at the next layby, put on our boots and started walking.

 

Geofforys Chimney

Jeffrey’s Chimney,  Shen-Hao TFC 45 with a 90mm Schneider Angulon with Fomapan 100 film.

We headed towards the first chimney built sometime in the 19th century. It job was to draw the poisonous arsenic and sulfur dioxide gases which where created by the smelting of the lead ore. We followed the remains of the stone lined flue that ran up from the valley far below.  As we got closer his twin brother started to rise into view.

Sikehead

Sikehead, Shen-Hao TFC 45 with a 90mm Schneider Angulon with Fomapan 100 film.

The second chimney had a markedly different character, while the first stood out bravely against the elements this one was tucked down in it’s own little valley on the edge of the fell. This was the site of the Sikehead Lead Mine and the chimney is all that remains of the engine house that housed a Cornish Beam Engine  which drew water from the mine shafts.

Twins Across The Moor

Twins Across the Moor, Shen-Hao TFC 45 with a 90mm Schneider Angulon with Fomapan 100 film.

It’s hard to visualise this being a place of industry and imagine these stacks pouring out black smoke and poisonous gases into the air, now all remains silent apart from the wind in the grasses and the mocking calls of grouse. Both stand as a testament to the people who worked in and built these mines and smelt mills.

When I got home I quickly developed my negs in Prescysol for 10mins and then contact printed them on Foma Chamois fibre based paper and got them to the gallery. The clients chose their favourite….but you will have to wait and see which one they like best and how the final print has turned out.

Cheers

Graham

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fifty Nine Degrees North!

Sorry for the lack of recent activity on my blog. I’m pleased to say I haven’t just been setting here idly waiting for the autumn leaves to change before I took any new photographs, I have in fact been on a trip to distant lands.  At the beginning of August I was lucky to take my family all the way across the sea to the Isles of Orkney. This dramatic group of islands lie off the northern most point of Scotland and are steeped in history, so much so the islanders say “if you cut the surface of the land, it will bleed archaeology!”  Everywhere you look you can see the remnants of its past, from standing stones and ancient burial tombs all the way through time to the ship wrecks and coastal defences of the Second World War. Its incredible to be in such a landscape with so many layers of history, some hidden just beneath the surface while others like the Ring Of Brodgar which even after 4000 years still dominate the landscape! It was a magical trip and even better because I was able to share it with my family.

Dwarfie Stone

Dwarfie Stane, Isle of Hoy.

 

ship wreck

Block Ship, Scapa Flow.

 

The Birsay Whale

The Birsay Whale, Orkney Mainland.

 

Waiting

Waiting for the return, Birsay.

 

Lonelest Grave

The lonely Grave of Betty Corrigall, Hoy.

 

Cotton Grass, Ring of Brogar

Cotton Grass, Ring Of Brodgar, Orkney Mainland.

Because this was a family holiday when it came to my camera gear I needed to travel as light as possible. I wanted to keep in simple so packed my Shen-Hoa TFC45 IIB Field Camera, a couple of lenses including my much-loved 90mm Schneider Angulon (which to be honest was the only lens I used the whole trip) and a good old reliable Schneider Solida II 6×6 folder. The 5×4 darkslides were loaded with Fomapan 100,  and for role film I took Kodak TriX 400. When we got home and it came to developing the films I decided to try something a bit different. Over the last few months I’ve been researching about the incredible potential of instant coffee and black and white film i.e Caffenol, more about that to come!!

Cheers

Graham

Northumberland Bound

Once again I have been fortunate to be given another commission from the gallery, this time to take a photograph of Bamburgh Castle on the Northumbrian coast, and of course it would have been rude not to have a little look at a few other places while I was up there.

Bamborgh Castle Wide

Shen- Hoa 5×4 with Schneider 90mm Angulon f6,8 lens, at f32 for 5th sec with red+ND+Grey Grad filters.

The client wanted me to capture the atmosphere of Bamburgh Castle and its beach. On the day this was to be a bit tricky, because for once the north of England was blessed with blue skies and glorious sunshine. I had to work quickly before all the cloud was burnt away by the sun.

Bamborgh Stag

The White Stag, Shen- Hoa 5×4 with Schneider 90mm Angulon f6,8 lens

Bamborgh Castle2

I wanted to see how my new Shen-Hoa 5×4 camera would work with some of my antique lenses. This was taken with my brass Bausch And Lomb Rapid Rectilinear, and I was really pleased with the results. By the late afternoon the clouds had pretty much gone but the tide had dropped enough for me to cross the causeway to the beautiful island of Lindisfarne also know as Holy Island because of it’s ancient Priory and connections to St Cuthbert. The lack of clouds ruled out long and distant views but I did manage to capture a great picture of one of the incredible fisherman’s hut, built from ancient upturned boats pulled up onto the shore.

Lindisfarne Boat

Shen- Hoa 5×4 with Schneider 90mm Angulon f6,8 lens, at f16 for 5sec with red+ND+Grey Grad filters.

All and all a pretty successful trip and I think the gallery will be really pleased with what I managed to get for the client! All these photographs where taken with Fomapan 100 film and then contact printed at grade 3 on Foma Chamois paper.

Cheers

Graham