Within the Landscape

While I was out testing the new Voigtlander beast I also took along my little Rolleicord TLR camera. A recent discovery of using lighter fluid to clean and lubricate sticking shutters has meant a host of my old cameras springing back into life after only a couple of drops of this magic medicine. The last few times I used the Rollei I had loads of misfires and fogged frames, but after a few little drops of lighter fluid the shutter was once again fully operational. I also had another happy discovery, while searching through a draw for a cable release I came across a little leather rollei case containing a set of Rolleinar 3 close up lenses. By adding these additional lenses (one for the taking lens and another for a viewing lens) means you can get much closer to your subject matter. These are handy because the humble little Rolleicord can only really focus on an object about 80cm away, but by fitting  these extra lenses to the camera you can focus right down to something 20cm away…..I know exciting stuff!!

Susan and Joana 005

Not only are they a useful little attachment they are also a superb quality lens and I was stunned by the sharpness and detail of the pictures they produced. It was great fun being able to take my little camera out again and use it in a whole new way, it really got my mind racing with thoughts of new photo possibilities. Here are a couple of the best shots of the day.

flotsum

Winter Flotsam, Hp5+ developed in Prescyol, printed on Foma Chamois.

Wire PostT Crop

Litchen Post, HP5+ developed in Prescysol, printed on Foma Chamois.

Thanks

Graham

A Camera Reborn….well almost

Well in my last post I said I was getting ready for a trip to Ilkley Moor, but it turned out I had once again lost complete track of time and I was a week a head of myself! So with a free day to play with I decided to nip up to the dales and test out a new camera.

A few months ago Richard a good friend of mine, asked me if I wanted to borrow a vintage folding camera which could take 6x11cm negatives.  It turned out to be  a lovely old 1930’s Voigtlander Inos II but the only problem was it was designed to take 116 film which is no longer made. Luckily though Richard has converted a number of similar cameras to take 120 film and assured me it was a pretty straight forward bit of DIY.  So with lots of helpful advice from Rich and a bit of internet research here’s what I did…

Camera Mod 020

My first problem was figuring out the best way to adapt the camera so it would take the smaller 120 film which is used in all modern medium format cameras and is readily available. The easiest way is to make some inserts which fill in the gaps between the camera sprockets and the spool of film so it’s held in place inside the camera. This is great because it means you don’t have to permenantly alter the camera.

2 spools

Inside the camera on one side there are two spring loaded pins which hold the role of unexposed film, on the other side there is a pin on the bottom and spade ended sprocket on the top, this is meant to fit into a slot in the end of the  film spool so you can advance film after every exposure. As you can see the width of the original 116 film spool (the bottom one) is not that much wider than the new 120, so I didn’t have much room to work with. After a little look online I found the easiest method is to take some plastic rawl plugs, cut them to size and push them into the ends of the spool.

Inserts1

This worked great but to make inserts for the wind on sprockets was a little more tricky. I tried a few different ways but none of them really seemed to work for me, so in the end I just did the same thing with the rawl plugs but this time I cut a slot in the rawl plug for the spade ended sprocket to fit into.

Inserts2

 

I then taped some thin strips of black card along the top and bottom of the film gate (the opening inside the camera where the film is exposed) to hold the narrower 120 film in place and stop it from curling up while I’m trying to take a picture.

film mask

 

Once that was done I found an old film I could use as a test role, a couple of runs through and everything seemed to be working ok. This camera like most folding cameras doesn’t have a film counter, instead you look through a small red glass inspection window in the back of the camera to read  the frame numbers which are printed onto the backing paper. But since I was now using a different film the numbers printed on the back of the film no longer matched the camera so the test role helped me get a rough idea how much film to wind on for each frame.  All I needed to do now was to put a new role of film through it, take some pictures and see what turned out!!

The weather was pretty decent  and I had a couple of ideas for some locations in Teesdale were I could try out the camera.

Camera test

Everything seemed to be working fine but when I got home and processed the film I found things hadn’t gone as well as I’d hoped.

 

 

Beach Trees

 

 

First I got a lot of fog. I checked the camera bellows with a torch (something I really should’ve done before hand) and I found a number of small holes where the material had frayed at the edge, that was a bit of a disappointment, but I didn’t think that was the only cause of the light leak. Being made over 80 years ago the film this camera was designed to take was much slower than the film we use today, it was also quite often Orthochromatic and not red light sensitive. The pictures I took in the woods out of direct sunlight had a lot less fog and the results were pretty good so I think the red film window on the back of the camera may have been allowing too much light in for the faster modern film. The only other little issue was that one side of the neg was uneven, but I have no idea why, it may be something to do with the film lifting at one side. Having said all that the negatives are still almost 6x10cm!!

tractor tyre

Well back to the drawing board! I did a bit of repair work to the bellows and double checked with the torch to make sure I’d sealed the holes, I then simply covered over the film window with some electrical tape. While I was tinkering I had a second look at the inserts for the film advancing spool and decided to make something a bit more substantial.

Film spool mod1

 

I took a couple of spare spools and cut the ends off and sanded them down to the correct size so that when I super glued them to either end of another spool the final width would be exactly the same as the original 116 one. You can also see in this picture my failed attempt to narrow the original 116 film spool using foam so it would take 120, but I was much happier with my final attempt and fingers crossed it should be a lot more stable.

Film spool mod2

 

 

So all there’s left to do now is give it another go!!

Cheers

Graham

 

 

 

 

Merry Christmas!!

Copely Chimney Xmas Card

Hello I would just like to wish everyone a very merry Christmas and a happy new year, and to thank you all for following my blog and for all the great comments you have made, it’s really made it all worth while. I’ve already got loads of places in mind to visit and ideas for new posts in the new year, can’t wait!!

Cheers

Graham

Behind the scenes.

Recently I’ve been asked for more details about how I create my photographs in the darkroom, and struck me that lately my blog has mostly been concentrating on my trips out and about taking pictures. But this is only really a small portion of the work that goes into making my final prints for sale in the gallery. In fact when I first started this blog this was one of the elements I really wanted to include, so in the future I’m going to try to show a little more behind the scenes, and try to explain some of the techniques and processes I use.

Photo for Gallerina 009

Setting up my 6×6 enlarger for a print destined for the gallery.

I am really lucky to be represented by Gallerina, a contemporary fine art gallery in Darlington so to get the ball rolling I thought I would post the trailer from the fantastic documentary they filmed about my work called Infinity!!

 

What I really love about this film is it gives a great snap shot of all the different steps I make to get to the completed photograph. Ok this bit may sound a bit of  a blatant plug but if  you are interested in seeing the full length film they may still have some copies of the DVD left at the gallery, please get in touch at www.gallerina.com

Cheers

Graham

 

 

 

 

 

Autumn has arrived……

View Rigg

Yad Moss to Cow Green, 6X9 Schnieder Rolflex with HP5+ in Caffenol CL 

Well autumn has finally arrived and the moorlands of the North Pennines are calling me. With an exciting new commission which has recently come in from Gallerina  and some amazing new places to explore over the coming month I can’t wait to lose myself in the bleak fells of the Durham Moors!!

Graham

The Missing Roll!

Just a quick post this time. A few weeks ago me and my girlfriend were woken up by an almighty bang!! It was 2 o clock in the morning and the large wood book-case that I thought was safely fixed to the wall, had decided to give in to gravity and collapse onto our bed just missing us both as we slept. Next morning me and Helen set about putting the book-case back up (this time with much bigger screws and lots of them) and tidying up all the books which had been scattered across the bedroom floor, in the midst of all this destruction I found a roll of exposed 120 film? I’m not the most organised of people, and like usual I hadn’t bothered to write anything on the film to tell me what it had been used for so I hadn’t a clue what it contained, so I decided the only way to figure out what was on it was to develop it. I had a couple of other films to process so I added the extra film into the mix.  And I was so pleased I did!!

ArticTurn

Tern, Inner Farne, Northumberland.

Rolleicord TLR, Fomapan 400 in Caffenol CL for 70mins.

For ages I had been wondering where one of the films from our holiday to Northumberland had gone. Though we had a superb time it hadn’t been the most successful in regards to photography. Everything from my old MPP 5×4 bellows leaking light to a sticky shutter on my Rolleicord, but every time I looked through the negs there was something missing? Some shots I swore I had taken but couldn’t find them, and here they where! Printing this photo really brought back a lots of great memories of a wonderful trip!!

Thanks for reading!!!

Graham

Fifty Nine Degrees North!

Sorry for the lack of recent activity on my blog. I’m pleased to say I haven’t just been setting here idly waiting for the autumn leaves to change before I took any new photographs, I have in fact been on a trip to distant lands.  At the beginning of August I was lucky to take my family all the way across the sea to the Isles of Orkney. This dramatic group of islands lie off the northern most point of Scotland and are steeped in history, so much so the islanders say “if you cut the surface of the land, it will bleed archaeology!”  Everywhere you look you can see the remnants of its past, from standing stones and ancient burial tombs all the way through time to the ship wrecks and coastal defences of the Second World War. Its incredible to be in such a landscape with so many layers of history, some hidden just beneath the surface while others like the Ring Of Brodgar which even after 4000 years still dominate the landscape! It was a magical trip and even better because I was able to share it with my family.

Dwarfie Stone

Dwarfie Stane, Isle of Hoy.

 

ship wreck

Block Ship, Scapa Flow.

 

The Birsay Whale

The Birsay Whale, Orkney Mainland.

 

Waiting

Waiting for the return, Birsay.

 

Lonelest Grave

The lonely Grave of Betty Corrigall, Hoy.

 

Cotton Grass, Ring of Brogar

Cotton Grass, Ring Of Brodgar, Orkney Mainland.

Because this was a family holiday when it came to my camera gear I needed to travel as light as possible. I wanted to keep in simple so packed my Shen-Hoa TFC45 IIB Field Camera, a couple of lenses including my much-loved 90mm Schneider Angulon (which to be honest was the only lens I used the whole trip) and a good old reliable Schneider Solida II 6×6 folder. The 5×4 darkslides were loaded with Fomapan 100,  and for role film I took Kodak TriX 400. When we got home and it came to developing the films I decided to try something a bit different. Over the last few months I’ve been researching about the incredible potential of instant coffee and black and white film i.e Caffenol, more about that to come!!

Cheers

Graham

Roseberry Topping

Hi

Just completed this comission and I’m really pleased with the way it turned out! I’ve never taken a picture of Roseberry Topping before and was worried what I could bring to such a popular and well photographed part of the Cleveland landscape, hopefully I have successfully managed to put my mark on it and create something fresh.

Roseberry Topping

For this one I wanted to use my old 5×4 M.P.P Mark II Technical camera. The lens was a 270mm Schneider Tele-Xenar I picked up for £65 last year (thrift is a important part of my photography haha) . I developed the Fomapan 100 film with Prescysol and then printed it on watercolour paper coated with liquid silver emulsion.

Thanks

Graham

Return to Bleath Gill

Hello, well this is my first real post on my new blog, I have decided to start with a small project I started a few weeks ago. The heavy snow that arrived in the Uk after Christmas lead me to rediscover this incredible short film created in the 1950’s about a steam train trapped in a snowdrift high up on the Pennine fells.  To see the film please follow the link!

The film inspired to find what remained of the old railway line where the engine was stranded close to the Stainmore summit. So I decided to create a mini series of photographs based on what I found when I visited the location.

Post

 

Bridge

 

Tree

 

Hut

When I got there the weather was bleak, the sky was still heavy with snow and a deep drift lay across the derelict remains of the track bed.  I decided to travel light and used a couple of my favourite vintage 120 folding cameras a 6×9 Frauka Rolfix and a Solida III  both have Schneider lenses. The film was Kodak TriX 400 which I developed with Prescysol developer.

Cheers

Graham